Messerschmitt BF-109 E4 TROP 1/48th Scale Model

Many apologies for taking so long on getting a new post out. I kinda doubt that anyone out there is actually watching, but I like imagining that there are. So to all you imaginary followers, thank you much, and sorry for the delay!

Like I said, the next project I was going to post was the Tamiya Messerschmitt BF-109 E4 TROP 1/48th scale model, a plastic aircraft model I picked up for Christmas last year. A little history on the BF-109 E4 TROP…

(Copy-pasted from Wikipedia, BTW)

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 was a German World War II fighter aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt in the early 1930s. It was one of the first true modern fighters of the era, including such features as an all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. Having gone through its baptism of fire in the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II, during which it was the backbone of the German Luftwaffe fighter force. An inverted Vee-piston engined fighter, the Bf 109 was supplemented, but never completely replaced in service, by the radial engined Focke-Wulf Fw 190 from the end of 1941. Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter bomber, day-, night- all-weather fighter, bomber destroyer, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several minor Axis states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945.

Bf-109 Left

So, now to my model. my model is a regular old Tamiya 1/48th scale styrene model, which is fairly cheap. It was also my first project with an airbrush, so I got alot of learning in on this one! I elected to go with a Battle of Britain color scheme, which has a yellow nose cone, geometric camouflage on the top of the aircraft, forest camo on the sides, and sky grey on the bottom.

I forgot to take pictures as I worked, so all I’ve got is a finished set of pictures. Sorry ’bout that.

Bf-109 Top

Bf-109 Back Perspective

Bf-109 Front Perspective

And that is it for this post. I don’t know what I’ll put up next, but hopefully, it’ll be cool.

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 was a German World War II fighter aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt in the early 1930s. It was one of the first true modern fighters of the era, including such features as an all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. Having gone through its baptism of fire in the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II, during which it was the backbone of the German Luftwaffe fighter force.[2] An inverted Vee-piston engined fighter, the Bf 109 was supplemented, but never completely replaced in service, by the radial engined Focke-Wulf Fw 190 from the end of 1941. Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter bomber, day-, night- all-weather fighter, bomber destroyer, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several minor Axis states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945.
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